Tom Brady Denied Trademark Registration of TOM TERRIFIC

Trademark registrations are among the most commonly pursued intellectual property rights in the U.S., yet it can be surprising just how little understood these protections are. It’s not unusual for the average person to believe that once a word or phrase is registered as a trademark, it is somehow illegal for anyone other than the rightful owner to use the mark.

Tom Terrific

However, this isn’t quite the case, as football legend Tom Brady recently learned. Brady and his legal team from TEB Capital Management filed two trademark applications with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this year trying to protect the “TOM TERRIFIC” mark.

Both applications stated that Brady and his team had an intent to use the mark in interstate commerce for goods such as T-shirts, printed photographs, posters and trading cards. An unintended public furor erupted as longtime fans of Tom Seaver, a baseball pitcher in the Hall of Fame, protested that the “Tom Terrific” moniker really belonged to him.

It seems that the USPTO was in agreement with the public on this one. They denied Brady’s applications based on the fact that the “TOM TERRIFIC” name was already closely associated with Seaver and had been for decades. Officials at the USPTO believed that if Brady were to introduce a line of goods associated with the TOM TERRIFIC mark that consumers would be confused as to whether the mark referred to Brady or Seaver.

Trademark Law

However, in view of Brady’s remarks in response to the furor, it appears that he didn’t understand U.S. trademark law in the first place. It seems that the reason that Brady filed the trademark applications was to prevent others from using the moniker in connection with him because he doesn’t like it.

In other words, Brady filed the trademark applications, stating under penalty of perjury that he and his company intended to use the marks in interstate commerce in connection with the identified goods, when he actually had no intention of doing so. Brady may have simply been annoyed when his team and people on social media referred to him as “Tom Terrific.” Seeking to stop such use, he had his legal and business team file trademark applications.

Unfortunately for Brady, that’s just not how trademark law works. The only way to obtain a federal trademark registration in the U.S. is by using the mark in interstate commerce and then demonstrating that use to the USPTO. If Brady never had a bona fide intent to use the mark in interstate commerce but instead wanted to prevent others from using a certain name, how could he ever expect to obtain a registration?

The answer may be that Brady did not consult with intellectual property attorneys before filing his applications. Intellectual property is a specific area of the law that not every lawyer is qualified to practice. Without focused education, training and experience, attorneys are not prepared to guide their clients through the process of obtaining a U.S. trademark.

Consulting with a trademark attorney would have saved Brady a great deal of time, money and embarrassment. Anyone interested in obtaining a federal registration of a trademark is encouraged to consult with an intellectual property attorney.

Author: Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams is an experienced mechanical engineer and lawyer that consults closely with clients in a strait forward and clear manner. He brings a particular set of strengths and unique perspectives to the firm.

Jeff received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2005. He was an engineer for a number of years at a number of large corporations before pursuing his law degree. He graduated from Texas A&M University School of Law (formerly Texas Wesleyan University School of Law) with a J.D. in 2010. By combining his education and prior work experience into the field of intellectual property law, Jeff has developed key skills to fully assist clients.

Patent vs copyright vs trademark


People who are unfamiliar with the various forms of intellectual property protection often use terms like “patent,” “trademark” and “copyright” almost interchangeably. In reality, these are three distinct forms of protection, each of which is designed to defend your rights to a specific type of intellectual property.

Understanding the difference is critical when you want to ensure that you have the right to fully defend your intellectual property. An intellectual property attorney can provide customized guidance and advice in your unique situation. Nonetheless, it is possible to describe here the three major forms of intellectual property protection.


What Is a Patent?

A patent protects a new invention, which may be a machine, a product, a process or a chemical composition. It is possible to obtain a patent on the design or appearance of an item just as it is possible to patent a new plant species.

A patent does not grant the holder the right to manufacture or sell their invention. Instead, it gives them the right to exclude others from using their proprietary innovation. Thus, if a patent holder notices that a competitor is selling a product that infringes on their patent rights, the patent holder may sue the alleged infringer.

Patents are only valid for a finite period of time. An invention is protected by a utility patent, which is valid for 20 years from the filing date of the patent application. A design patent is valid for only 14 years from its filing date.

While the patent is in force, it is possible for the owner to license it to others who may manufacture, sell or otherwise use the patented subject matter. Patent owners also may sell their rights to another party.

What Is a Trademark?

Trademarks may take many forms, including a single word or an entire phrase. A trademark registration also may cover a design, symbol or a combination of text and a design.

The strongest trademarks are unique and distinctive. Their primary purpose is to identify the source of the goods or services on which they are used. For example, when people see the famous Nike “swoosh” on a pair of shoes, they are immediately able to identify the footwear as coming from Nike.

In the U.S., trademarks are registered for particular goods and services that the owner must identify in their application for registration. Use of the mark in connection with the goods or services must begin in U.S. commerce before a registration can be obtained.

Accordingly, a company or individual may apply for a trademark registration that covers a wide variety of goods and services such as restaurant services, t-shirts and music performances. Before a registration can be obtained, the owner must demonstrate that the mark is actually being used on all of these goods and services. If they decide not to use their trademark on t-shirts, then these goods must be deleted from the application before the mark can proceed to registration.

U.S. trademarks are renewable in perpetuity for 10-year periods. Every 10 years, the owner must submit fees and proof that the mark is still being used in commerce.

What Is a Copyright?

A copyright is used to protect any work of original authorship. While most people understand that a book is copyrighted, they may be more surprised to learn that a painting, sculpture, choreographic work, photograph, movie or software code also may be protected with a copyright.

Copyright protection is automatic in the U.S. As soon as a creative expression is captured in some tangible form, it is copyrighted. However, it is further possible to register the material with the U.S. Copyright Office. Doing so provides the owner with additional means of protecting their original work.

This means that the author has control over reproductions of their work as well as any derivative works. Any public performance or display of their work may only be pursued with the author’s permission. Failure to obtain such permission may lead to litigation.

Typically, the term of a registered copyright is the lifetime of the work’s author plus an additional 70 years.

Which Type of IP Protection Should You Pursue?

If you are an inventor, innovator or entrepreneur, then you may need to pursue one or more forms of IP protection. A software developer could copyright the code on a new program, obtain a trademark registration for the software’s name and get a patent on a process within the program.

Working with a qualified intellectual property attorney is the best way to ensure that your rights are sufficiently protected by patents, trademarks and copyrights.

Author: Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams is an experienced mechanical engineer and lawyer that consults closely with clients in a strait forward and clear manner. He brings a particular set of strengths and unique perspectives to the firm.

Jeff received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2005. He was an engineer for a number of years at a number of large corporations before pursuing his law degree. He graduated from Texas A&M University School of Law (formerly Texas Wesleyan University School of Law) with a J.D. in 2010. By combining his education and prior work experience into the field of intellectual property law, Jeff has developed key skills to fully assist clients.

Challenging Trademark Registrations

Obtaining a trademark registration is an important part of intellectual property protection. In the U.S., a registration may be granted to the owner of a unique and distinctive mark that does not appear to infringe on the trademark rights of any other owner.

Trademark Examination

Each trademark application that is filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is examined by an attorney. The attorney ensures that the application complies with all formalities and meets the minimum requirements for being a trademark. Additionally, the attorney performs a search of existing trademarks to determine whether or not consumers are likely to confuse the proposed mark with an existing mark.

Publication for Opposition
If the application clears all of these hurdles, then it is published. Publication marks the beginning of a 30-day period in which anyone may oppose registration of the mark. When an opposition is made, it most frequently comes from a competitor who feels that their mark is confusingly similar and that the goods and services on which the mark will be used travel in the same trade channels.

The opposition process provides an opportunity for the two sides to negotiate and perhaps arrive at an amicable resolution. For instance, the applicant may agree to eliminate a particular good or service from their description. However, if the two parties cannot arrive at an agreement, then a period for collecting discovery and evidence will ensue. Occasionally, these matters go to trial, with both sides arguing for their right to use the mark.

Petition for Cancellation

Opposing a trademark application after publication is a relatively common occurrence. Less commonly, a trademark registration may be challenged after it has already been established.

The Lanham Act enables parties to challenge a registration under certain circumstances. Any party that believes it may be damaged by the mark is empowered to challenge it. In this case, the challenging party will have to file a petition with the USPTO for cancellation of the mark from the Principal Register. Such a petition must comply with certain time periods such as:

  • The petition is made no more than five years from the publication date of the application
  • Whenever the mark in question becomes generic, is abandoned or is determined to be fraudulent
  • Whenever a certification mark is not being used within the limits of its certification

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, or TTAB, is the department that is responsible for deciding whether or not an application can proceed to registration after an opposition or if an existing registration can remain on the Principal Register once it has been challenged.

In the case of an application, the TTAB may elect not to allow the mark in question to proceed to registration. An existing registration may be cancelled or the TTAB may place restrictions on the use of the mark. On the other hand, the TTAB may choose to proceed with registration or maintain the registration of an existing mark.

Who Can Challenge a Trademark Registration?

Many people assume that only the owner of a similar trademark may oppose or petition to cancel someone else’s trademark. The reality is that even consumers who do not own a trademark may participate in this process.

TTAB reinforced this concept with their decision regarding United Trademark Holdings, Inc.’s application to register the mark RAPUNZEL. A law professor opposed the registration of the mark, arguing that the registration would “constrain the marketplace” and raise prices for dolls manufactured by other companies and sold under the name Rapunzel. The applicant for the mark argued that the opposer lacked standing, but TTAB disagreed. Their conclusion was that “In no case has this court ever held that one must have a specific commercial interest, not shared by the general public, in order to have standing as an opposer.” Going on, they stated that the consumer has a “real interest” in keeping generic terms off of the Principal Register.

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Author: Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams is an experienced mechanical engineer and lawyer that consults closely with clients in a strait forward and clear manner. He brings a particular set of strengths and unique perspectives to the firm.

Jeff received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2005. He was an engineer for a number of years at a number of large corporations before pursuing his law degree. He graduated from Texas A&M University School of Law (formerly Texas Wesleyan University School of Law) with a J.D. in 2010. By combining his education and prior work experience into the field of intellectual property law, Jeff has developed key skills to fully assist clients.

Trademark Enforcement: It’s Not Black and White

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but when that imitation involves the use of your proprietary intellectual property, then you are likely to feel far more angered than flattered.

That’s because a successful branding effort is incredibly valuable. When consumers see a recognizable brand name, they feel a connection. Hopefully, it’s a positive one that includes associations with reliability, functionality, comfort, stylishness or other affirmative attributes.

Building a brand is rarely an accident. Typically, a great deal of ingenuity and grit are involved. This is in addition to the considerable expenditure of money to properly promote and sell the brand.


Enter the Imitators

When a brand enjoys success, it is all-but inevitable that copycats will ensue. These copycats may sell a similar product under a very similar brand name. This also is no accident. The copycat is hoping to capitalize on the goodwill embodied by the trusted brand name. They reason that enough consumers will be confused that they will choose their product over the original.

Erosion of a Brand Name

Unsurprisingly, this can become a major headache for the owner of the original brand. With an imitator out there, it’s only a matter of time before consumers start mistaking the copycat for the original. Chances are good that the copycat’s wares are inferior to those offered by the originator. How long will it be before the negative impression engendered by the imitator begins to tarnish the sterling reputation of the real brand name?

Is Trademark Enforcement Necessary?

The efforts of many copycats go nowhere or their efforts are so insignificant that they are a mere nuisance. However, there are cases where imitators become well known and start to cause real, measurable damage. How does the owner of a brand determine whether or not it’s worthwhile to enforce their trademark rights against an infringer?

The first step is determining how strong the trademark is. A more arbitrary and unique trademark is a better one than a mark that is generic. For instance, essentially made-up words like Pepsi, Exxon and Kodak are all excellent examples of strong trademarks. They are arbitrary in that they don’t immediately suggest the products they sell. A trademark that is merely descriptive of the goods is going to be much harder to enforce. However, if your trademark is arbitrary and unique, it will be easier to enforce.

Registration May Help with Trademark Enforcement

Another good indicator of your ability to enforce your trademark is whether or not it is registered. A U.S. trademark registration makes your mark enforceable in all 50 states. A state registration protects your mark within that state. Common law rights are available to people who hold an unregistered trademark, but they can be limited in scope and make enforcement complicated.

If the competitor is going to be operating in the same geographic area in which the original owner has any trademark rights, then it may be easier to fight the imitator. Overlapping geographic locations will spark consumer confusion, raising questions of unfair competition as well. Alternatively, if each trademark owner is sticking to a specific and remote geographic location, then enforcement action may not be necessary. The owners may agree to avoid each other’s areas, and never the twain shall meet.

Being vigilant for your trademark rights may be critical to your company’s success. However, this does not mean that every potential case of trademark infringement is worth pursuing with all means at the company’s disposal. Doing so would be distracting and expensive. Instead, all enforcement actions should be considered on an individual basis and with the guidance of an intellectual property attorney. Some instances of potential infringement are absolutely worth pursuing with every available means. However, it may be business reasonable to choose to ignore some potential infringers while seeking amicable agreements with others. This mitigates costs and risks without diluting the goodwill associated with the trademark at issue.

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Author: Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams is an experienced mechanical engineer and lawyer that consults closely with clients in a strait forward and clear manner. He brings a particular set of strengths and unique perspectives to the firm.

Jeff received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2005. He was an engineer for a number of years at a number of large corporations before pursuing his law degree. He graduated from Texas A&M University School of Law (formerly Texas Wesleyan University School of Law) with a J.D. in 2010. By combining his education and prior work experience into the field of intellectual property law, Jeff has developed key skills to fully assist clients.

Procter & Gamble Apply to Register Trademarks for LOL and NBD

Trademark Value

A company’s trademarks are among its most valuable assets. In most cases, those words and logos are what identify a product or service. Consumers recognize the mark, and this may influence their decision to make a purchase. Really effective and recognizable trademarks can be extremely valuable, which is why many owners choose to register these marks with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Most of the strongest trademarks have little obvious connection to the products they sell. After all, what does the word “apple” have to do with laptops and cell phones? This lack of an obvious connection makes these marks incredibly distinctive and memorable, which is helpful when you’re trying to sell something. Perhaps Procter & Gamble was considering this principle when they applied to register trademarks like “LOL,” WTF” and “NBD” earlier this year.

The Conflict

When most people hear about these applications, the immediate response is, “They can’t trademark that!” The reaction is understandable. These text-message acronyms have been around for years, and millions of people use them multiple times per day. If Procter & Gamble is successful in their quest, does it mean that no one can use these acronyms anymore?

The answer is “no.” Everyone can feel free to keep LOL-ing as much as they like. Obtaining registration of trademarks in the U.S. requires the applicant to use the mark on goods or services that are sold in interstate commerce. The applicant must specifically identify these goods and then actually use the mark on those goods before the mark can be registered. Once these rights are obtained, the owner of the registration may be able to prevent another manufacturer or retailer from using the same mark for the same or similar goods, but they do not necessarily have the right to stop others from using the mark on totally different products or in personal text messages.

As an example, Procter & Gamble’s application for the “LOL” mark says that they plan to use it on products like laundry detergents and fabric softeners. If someone else decided that they wanted to sell LOL Cola, then they’d stand a pretty good chance of getting a registration even if Procter & Gamble already holds a registration for the LOL mark for laundry detergent. Why? Because it seems pretty unlikely that a consumer is going to see “LOL Cola” and assume that it comes from the same people who sell “LOL Laundry Detergent.”

The Motive

Not all of Procter & Gamble’s applications have been formally examined yet, but it seems likely that the company will be able to register the marks if they meet all deadlines and actually begin using the marks in interstate commerce on the specified products. Of course, the natural question that follows is: “Why would they want to register these trademarks?”

On the surface, the answer isn’t obvious. The acronym NBD has nothing to do with dishwashing detergents. However, all of these acronyms are immediately recognizable to teens and young adults, and that is precisely the age group to which Procter & Gamble is trying to appeal. They already have a stable of well-known brand names like Crest, Charmin, Bounty and Dawn, but they are probably looking for new brands that will appeal to a new generation.

Will P&G Succeed?

Will Procter & Gamble be successful with their applications? It’s too soon to tell. However, this is probably just one piece of a new marketing strategy that may serve to keep this venerable company relevant for a few more decades. If your company hasn’t considered registering any trademarks yet, perhaps now is the time. Contact an attorney to learn about your options.

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Author: Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams is an experienced mechanical engineer and lawyer that consults closely with clients in a strait forward and clear manner. He brings a particular set of strengths and unique perspectives to the firm.

Jeff received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2005. He was an engineer for a number of years at a number of large corporations before pursuing his law degree. He graduated from Texas A&M University School of Law (formerly Texas Wesleyan University School of Law) with a J.D. in 2010. By combining his education and prior work experience into the field of intellectual property law, Jeff has developed key skills to fully assist clients.

Washington Redskins and Trademark Rights

February 4, 2016

Federal Court Decision May Shore Up Redskins’ Trademark Rights

Is the name used by the NFL’s Washington Redskins offensive? That question is at the heart of an on-going court battle between members of the Native American community and the team’s owners. A court decision at the end of 2015 seems to favor the team’s ability to keep their Redskins trademark rights, but the plaintiffs are likely to continue their fight against registration of the mark.

The Case

The first legal action against registration of the Redskins’ trademarks came in 1992 when Suzan Harjo and other Native Americans attempted to cancel the registrations by petitioning the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. At the heart of their claim was the Lanham Act, one of the foundations of U.S. trademark law, which says that any trademarks that are “disparaging, scandalous, contemptuous, or disreputable” cannot be legally registered. It took seven years, but the USPTO eventually agreed with Harjo, cancelling registration of the Redskins’ trademarks. Team owners appealed the decision in court, winning on the grounds that there was insufficient evidence of disparagement. Further appeals followed, but Harjo and the other plaintiffs were unable to win, with courts saying they had waited too far beyond their 18th birthdays to file suit.

Amanda Blackhorse and other plaintiffs filed their own cancellation action in 2006. This group of plaintiffs was younger, giving them an advantage over the previous efforts. Initially, the new lawsuit appeared to pay off. In July of 2015, a federal court ordered the USPTO to cancel six trademark registrations of the Redskins mark. The judge made it clear that the team can still use the mark, but that federal registration of the mark is not legal because it could be seen as disparaging or offensive.

The December ruling turned matters around in favor of the team’s ownership. The Washington D.C. District Court decided that the Lanham Act’s prohibition against disparaging marks might constitute viewpoint discrimination, which would violate the First Amendment rights of citizens. This decision was not actually rendered in connection with the Redskins’ lawsuit. Instead, it originated in the legal efforts of an Oregon rock band that calls itself The Slants.

A Similar Case

The Slants, four Asian-American men, attempted to gain a federal trademark registration of their name, but the USPTO refused on the grounds that the name might be considered disparaging. Undaunted, and with the assistance of a trademark attorney, the young men continued to pursue their rights for trademark registration. Those efforts finally appear to be paying off, and the victory for The Slants may translate into victory for the owners of the Redskins trademark.

Obtaining federal registration of a trademark is not always a straightforward process. Frequently, it is necessary to engage in nuanced legal arguments before the USPTO consents to registration. The cases involving the Redskins and The Slants are extreme. Most trademark rights battles do not drag on for years nor do they involve federal litigation. Still, it makes a great deal of sense to rely on the services of an experienced trademark attorney when you want to seek registration for your brand name or logo.

If you need Trademark Assistance

Texas trademark attorney Jeff Williams has tremendous experience when it comes to obtaining and protecting the intellectual property rights of his clients. If you are interested in obtaining or enforcing your trademark rights, contact the Law Office of Jeff Williams to learn more.

5 Times in History when a Trademark was Stolen or Lost

May 11, 2015

Your trademark is the lifeblood of your business. It’s what your business comes to be known by, and it can consist of symbols, words or a word that is used to represent the company’s goods or services. Trademarks can be tricky for new business owners because there are both common law trademarks that utilize the ™ symbol, and then there are federal Trademark Law that utilize the ® symbol.

Federal trademarks have been registered legally, though, which means that although your business might have been utilizing a trademark longer with the ™ symbol, another business could come along and gain rights to your trademark if the owners apply to have it registered with the U.S. government and obtain registration. Although your business may have been the originator of the trademark, if the trademark was not officially registered, another company could obtain it for use in geographic areas outside your use, and essentially “steal” your trademark. This is why it’s extremely important to ensure that you understand trademark law and seek the assistance of a trademark attorney like those found at the Law Office of Jeff Williams in Texas.

Plenty of instances exist during which companies lost their trademarks because the owners didn’t take the opportunity to appropriately register it with the federal government.

1. Around the World in 80 Jobs

In 2012, a man named Turner Barr started a blog entitled, “Around the World in 80 Jobs.” The man’s blog shared his experiences finding gainful employment, traveling and living abroad oversees, how he funded his traveling by taking interesting travel jobs and provided other people with travel job opportunities so they could do the same thing. His site gained huge amounts of traffic. However, a huge company named Adecco USA later came along and began a similar campaign and used Barr’s title, “Around the World in 80 Jobs.” Because Adecco USA filed a trademark application for the trademark, though, they were the ones who ultimately received rights to it.

2. Gucci Vs. Guess

Gucci and Guess are two world-renowned companies that are known for their infringement battles. Gucci has accused Guess of using their trademarked colors and symbols often throughout the years in a manner that borders on copying the Gucci brand and causes brand confusion. In 2012, Guess was found guilty of copying Gucci trademarks, such as the red-green stripe mark, the repeating GG pattern, the stylized G design mark, the script Gucci design mark and the diamond motif trade dress. Although Guess may have been using some of the designs before Gucci, because Gucci had the designs registered, they won the ruling in the case.

3. RIM Vs. BBM

Jim McLeoad is the owner of a broadcasting representation group in Canada called BBM, which stands for BlackBerry Messenger Service. His company had been using the name “BBM” for nearly 6 years when in 2010, the owner spots a RIM (Research in Motion, Ltd.) billboard utilizing his trademark to advertise its messaging service. Although the BBM trademark was well associated with the company, because it was not officially registered, RIM was able to begin marketing with the other company’s trademark.

4. Tyra Banks

Tyra Banks is one of the most popular supermodels of all time, and some wig making companies created wigs utilizing Tyra’s name, photos, images and identity in 2013. Tyra chose to sue the companies stating that they were infringing upon her very famous name. Although her name itself might not be officially trademarked, since the companies did not obtain the appropriate trademarking and permission from the supermodel to utilize what’s associated with her, they could be facing millions of dollars in penalties.

As you can see, not properly registering your trademark can result in it becoming lost or stolen or end up with you being charged with trademark infringement. A trademark attorney who is skilled at trademark law like the ones at the Law Office of Jeff Williams in Texas can assist you in making sure that all your trademarks are legal.

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Strong Trademark? Is the mark really worth it?


Oct 17, 2014

This month a man in Alabama filed for a trademark to the phrase “Ebola Outbreak Map”. I’m all for the quick response to trends but is this too far? Is it even worth it? For a trademark to be valuable there should be a market for the goods/services it represents and the chosen name needs to be strong enough to pass examination. I think this fails.

First, examinations and the eventual registration may take 18 months. Will Ebola be around by then? Will it be widespread to need a map? The world is hoping not. The market may not be there.

Secondly, to get a trademark registered, examination is required. The patent office looks to the class of goods and services the trademark is filed under and then compares the trademark to other similar marks. In this case, “Ebola Outbreak Map” is filed under one goods class (016) and three service classes (35, 39, 42). In each of those classes, the mark will be judged on a scale (so to speak) ranging from Generic —-> Descriptive —-> Suggestive —-> Arbitrary & Fanciful. Generic is not allowable for the most part, while Arbitrary & Fanciful are by far the simplest to get through (as long as you are unique). It is easy to pick a name for a product or service. It is not always easy to pick a good name or strong name. In my opinion this mark looks to be stuck around the Generic and Descriptive area. The chance of registering it is slim. Paying for 4 classes puts him out around $1300.

In the end, it appears as though the owner ran out and quickly grabbed a generic/descriptive name to register while assuming that Ebola will become a long term and widespread problem. Maybe it will, but for a trademark to be valuable there should be a market and strength in the name. Sadly the name appears weak and the market will hopefully collapse soon. Additionally, you will notice on the registration that the owner of the mark did not appear to hire an attorney and may not have even solicited advice from one. In my opinion, with an eye to the business realities of life, it is not worth pursuing this mark, even if worldwide catastrophic outbreaks occur beyond the 18 months. The name should have been made less Generic and Descriptive. Best if he just talked to an attorney.

Lesson Learned: Quick actions are good but uneducated hastiness is costly.

Here is the link

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